Unhealthy Eating Habits Essaytyper

No one eats perfectly all the time – even dietitians! But when bad habits become common practice, you can end up with weight gain, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and a host of other potential health problems. So which lousy habits are getting folks into trouble? Here are the top 10 faux pas on our hit list, and how to avoid them. How many are part of your regular routine?

1: Poor Meal Planning

According to our readers, “time” is one of the biggest barriers to healthy eating, but last-minute decisions often lead to fast-food drive thrus and pizza delivery. Taking a few minutes to plan out weekly meals before shopping for the week will save you money, calories,  and time in the long run.  In a hurry? Try these healthy, 20-minute dinners tonight >>

2: Too Many Meals Away From Home

Restaurants and take-out will always mean super-sized portions, along with more calories and sodium. Make the effort to prepare meals at home most nights of the week and use our tips when you do venture out.

3: Too Many Processed Foods

Salty and fatty convenience foods that have been stripped of nutrients are everywhere you turn. Opt for mostly fresh and whole foods and read labels to help make the smartest choices when you do go for more highly processed goods.  Get our 10 tips to be a savvy label reader >>

4: Too Much Added Sugar

Aside from the candies, cookies and soda that Americans already eat too much of, sugar is lurking in places you might not expect, like whole grain cereals, salad dressings, condiments and breads. Take inventory of the total sugar in your diet and find ways to cut back on those empty calories.

5.    Mindless Eating

Instead of just eating when hungry, many of us grab food when we’re bored, tired, stressed, happy, sad – you name it! Check out our tips for eating smart and for the right reasons.

6.    Not Eating Together

Along the same lines as eating mindlessly comes eating while distracted, over-scheduled and in multiple shifts. Turn off the TV (and yes, even the computer and cell phone) at meals and make time to eat as a family as much as possible.

7: Eating on the Run

Leaving the house for a busy day without packed snacks or meals sets the stage for diet disaster. You’ll resort to meals that are too processed, too heavy, and too much on your waistline.

8: Giant Portion Sizes

You think you can eyeball portions but have you ever really measured out your morning cereal, spoonfuls of peanut butter or olive oil for cooking? Overdoing portions (even with healthy foods) can cause a calorie overload. Just do it a few times to give yourself some perspective. Get our tips for perfect portion sizes >>

9: Too Many Liquid Calories

It’s easy to forget that calories from soda, juices and other sugar-sweetened beverages count! Sip on calorie-free beverages like water, unsweetened teas and seltzers in place of the high calorie drinks. Don't like water? Try these low-cal ways to flavor it up >>

10: Not Eating Enough Throughout The Day

Less definitely isn’t always more! Not taking in enough calories throughout the day tanks energy levels, spikes hunger, and leads to overeating later on (when you’re tired and ready to eat everything in sight). Avoid stuffing yourself into the afternoon and evening by spreading out calories starting with a healthy breakfast.

TELL US: What terrible eating habit would you like to break?

Dana Angelo White, MS, RD, ATC, is a registered dietitian, certified athletic trainer and owner of Dana White Nutrition, Inc., which specializes in culinary and sports nutrition. See Dana's full bio »

You Might Also Like:

Keep Reading

Worldwide, consumption of healthy foods such as fruit and vegetables has improved during the past two decades, but has been outpaced by the increased intake of unhealthy foods including processed meat and sweetened drinks in most world regions, according to the first study to assess diet quality in 187 countries covering almost 4.5 billion adults, published in The Lancet Global Health journal.

Improvements in diet quality between 1990 and 2010 have been greatest in high-income nations, with modest reductions in the consumption of unhealthy foods and increased intake of healthy products. However, people living in many of the wealthiest regions (eg, the USA and Canada, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand) still have among the poorest quality diets in the world, because they have some of the highest consumption of unhealthy food worldwide.

In contrast, some countries in sub-Saharan Africa and some countries in Asia (eg, China and India) have seen no improvement in their diet quality over the past 20 years.

The authors warn that the study presents a worrying picture of increases in unhealthy eating habits outpacing increases in healthy eating patterns across most world regions, and say that concerted action is needed to reverse this trend.

Led by Dr Fumiaki Imamura from the Medical Research Council Epidemiology Unit at the University of Cambridge in the UK, a team of international researchers analysed data on the consumption of 17 key food items and nutrients related to obesity and major non-communicable diseases (eg, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and diet-related cancers) in countries around the world, and changes in diets between 1990 and 2010.

This analysis was performed by the Global Burden of Diseases Nutrition and Chronic Diseases Expert Group (NutriCoDE), chaired by Dr Dariush Mozaffarian, senior author on the paper and dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. NutriCoDE is an ongoing project assessing dietary information from more than 300 dietary surveys across the world and UN Food and Agriculture food-balance sheets, covering almost 90% of the global adult population.

The international team examined three different diet patterns: a favourable one based on 10 healthy food items (fruit, vegetables, beans and legumes, nuts and seeds, whole grains, milk, total polyunsaturated fatty acids, fish, omega-3s, and dietary fibre); an unfavourable one defined by seven unhealthy items (unprocessed meats, processed meats, sugar-sweetened drinks, saturated fat, trans fat, dietary cholesterol, and sodium); and an overall diet pattern based on all 17 food groups. The researchers calculated a diet score for each pattern and assessed differences by country, age, sex, and national income, with a higher score indicating a healthier diet (range 0-100).

The findings reveal that diet patterns vary widely by national income, with high-income countries generally having better diets based on healthy foods (average score difference +2.5 points), but substantially poorer diets due to a higher intake of unhealthy foods compared with low-income countries (average score difference -33.0 points). On average, older people and women seem to consume better diets.

The highest scores for healthy foods were noted in several low-income countries (eg, Chad and Mali) and Mediterranean nations (eg, Turkey and Greece), possibly reflecting favourable aspects of the Mediterranean diet. In contrast, low scores for healthy foods were shown for some central European countries and republics of the former Soviet Union (eg, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, and Kyrgyzstan).

Of particular interest was that the large national differences in diet quality were not seen, or were far less apparent, when overall diet quality (including both healthy and unhealthy foods) was examined as previous studies have done.

"By 2020, projections indicate that non-communicable diseases will account for 75% of all deaths. Improving diet has a crucial role to play in reducing this burden," says Dr Imamura. "Our findings have implications for governments and international bodies worldwide. The distinct dietary trends based on healthy and unhealthy foods, we highlight, indicate the need to understand different, multiple causes of these trends, such as agricultural, food industry, and health policy. Policy actions in multiple domains are essential to help people achieve optimal diets to control the obesity epidemic and reduce non-communicable diseases in all regions of the world."

According to Dr Mozaffarian, "There is a particularly urgent need to focus on improving diet quality among poorer populations. If we do nothing, undernutrition will be rapidly eclipsed by obesity and non-communicable diseases, as is already being seen in India, China, and other middle-income countries."

Writing in a linked Comment, Carlo La Vecchia from the University of Milan in Italy and Lluis Serra-Majem from the University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria in Spain say, "The key focus of the paper remains the need to understand the agricultural, trade, and food industry, and health policy determinants to improve dietary patterns and nutrition in various areas, taking into account the traditional characteristics of diets worldwide… Information about the environmental effect of dietary patterns will be needed in the future [particularly from low and middle income countries], because food not only drives human health, but also the health of the planet."


Story Source:

Materials provided by The Lancet. Note: Content may be edited for style and length.


Journal Reference:

  1. Fumiaki Imamura, Renata Micha, Shahab Khatibzadeh, Saman Fahimi, Peilin Shi, John Powles, Dariush Mozaffarian. Dietary quality among men and women in 187 countries in 1990 and 2010: a systematic assessment. The Lancet Global Health, 2015; 3 (3): e132 DOI: 10.1016/S2214-109X(14)70381-X


Cite This Page:

The Lancet. "Unhealthy eating habits outpacing healthy eating patterns in most world regions." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 18 February 2015. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150218191719.htm>.

The Lancet. (2015, February 18). Unhealthy eating habits outpacing healthy eating patterns in most world regions. ScienceDaily. Retrieved March 13, 2018 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150218191719.htm

The Lancet. "Unhealthy eating habits outpacing healthy eating patterns in most world regions." ScienceDaily. www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150218191719.htm (accessed March 13, 2018).

0 comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *